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Search Results 0 to 49 of about 71 (some duplicates have been removed)
of america through the senses. the population reached 17 million in 26 states. we consistently see 30%. slaves #2.5 million, which is almost 15% of the population, and new orleans joins the list of the largest cities in the united states. we heard about the tylers and their attitude toward slavery. give us an indication of what was happening in 1840. >> this is a tremendous time of sexual tension. we like to think the country is divided regionally, that everyone in the north is anti slavery and everyone in the south is proslavery. it is not that simple. people in the north benefited from slavery and the slave trade until it was ended. they now move into a different economic arena. they no longer need slavery, and slippery as a threat to them because of the free labor system in the north, and the kinds of the economy that is needed to preserve institutions in the north are different from those in the south, so what is happening in congress is both groups want to control legislation, because if you are in more industrialized regions, we want certain parts of laws passed to preserve the
supports the nsa surveillance program. he says the program itself works in protecting america from terrorism and has what he calls a 99.99% batting average in being compliant. >> this whole tone of snooping and spying that we use i think it's horrible, it's a distortion and a smear and a slander of good patriotic americans. >> reporter: senator rand paul, by the way, says the constitutionality of the nsa program must be evaluated. steve? >> thank you very much. peter king went directly at rand paul, said basically he's lying about the program. and he's just breathless in defending it as michael hayden. where is the president? he doesn't go to pat for this. he's analyzing this and it's his program. from michael hayden he says "the washington post" publishes this story. look at the numbers. there's been 115 incidents, incorrectly entered. mistakes made. none intentional. so that's out of 61 million inquiries a compliance rate of 99.998. look beyond the numbers and the headlines. >> right. michael hayden has and i temple in the "usa today" today where he talks in an op-ed just trust u
which america could take military action in syria this as calls grow to forcefully respond to evidence that the assad regime killed hundreds of its own people with chemical weapons. >>> the wildfire the size of the chicago raging in and around a cherished american landmark, the yosemite national park but the rim fire poses a threat to hundred of thousands of residents in san francisco and it is a 150 miles away. we'll tell you about that. >>> sentencing for the army major convicted of killing 13 people in the fort hood shooting massacre the will nidal hasan get life in prison or the death penalty. but first right now, brand new stories. >> inyou had concluding this one, jon, busted for buging? a new report says the nsa cracked videoconferencing system at u.n. and apparently that is not all. >>> plus jody arias is back before a judge. today we could learn when the retrial of the convicted killer's penalty phase will begin. >>> and there is talk about making an entrance? bandits storm a pawn shop. why what they got away with has police very worried. it is all happing right now. jon: good
. and this was a six-year-old when he came to america. this is him now. elaine quijano on how an afghan boy got his childhood back. uijaw captioning sponsored by cbs this is the "cbs evening news" with scott pelley. this is the "cbs evening news" wi >> schieffer: good evening. scott's on assignment. i'm bob schieffer. three young women were held captive for a decade in a dilapidated cleveland house where they were repeatedly raped and abused. but ariel castro, the man who pleaded guilty to the crime, said today it was everybody's fault but his and claimed the women were actually happy. judge michael russo was not convinced. he sentenced castro to life in prison without parole, plus 1,000 years. dean reynolds is at the courthouse. >> reporter: a shackled ariel castro scanned the courtroom today for a familiar face. there was at least one, michelle knight, one of the three women he imprisoned in his home fair decade of sexual and emotional brutality. she told the court and castro what it was like living in that house with its windows boarded up, trip alarms on the doors, the heavy chains, the pole th
alone america. obama, call him a liberal or what you want but he was not on the fringe. he was down the plate of the democratic party. you have guys who are both not ready and also taking really wacko bird positions to -- >> at the same time, a lot of that has to do with the fact where you live and what your views are. there are a lot of people in middle america that don't see ted cruz or rand paul or marco rubio out of the mainstream. a lot of people. as many people don't think they are, as people don't think barack obama is. i mean barack obama -- >> they're not even in the mainstream of the republican party. barack obama was in the mainstream of the democratic party. he may have been inexperienced. >> when these guys came in 2010 they are in the mainstream of the republican party. look at the fact that in 2010 it's not like there were a couple people that snuck. >> office. republicans won the largest legislative landslide on the state and national level i think probably in the 20 -- in a century. it was a remarkable victory for them. the problem that some of them don't understand
. >>> joining me now is john watch -- walsh. host of america's most wanted. fascinating interview, painting a very different picture, sort of kind of persona that we seem to be dealing with with a mass killer and kidnapper. what do you make of it? >> well, he's certainly hoping it isn't his friend and we live in such a society that both you and i would say this man is accused of kidnapping this girl and murdering her mother and probably her brother. we should stay accused by the fbi and police say he is pedophile that kidnapped a 16-year-old girl and the main suspect in the murder e of her mother and the murder of her 8-year-old brother, although they haven't determined those are his remains yet. so it seems the law enforcement agencies and the state of california, which issued the amber alert think he's the number one suspect. let's not forget about jerry sandusky who was sod miezing an 11-year-old boy in the locker room and nobody could believe it was jerry sandusky. >> right. >> ariel castro who kept three girls in a house for ten years, his little 14-year-old daughter was gina dee jesu
of america's most vocal critics. we shouldn't forget the difference between the ability of our government to collect information online under strict guidelines and for narrow purposes than the willingness of some other governments to throw their own citizens in prison for what they say online. >> stephanie: talking to you, putin. >> we're not there. >> stephanie: right. [ ♪ battle hymn of republic ] >> i'm with alan grayson. >> stephanie: what did edward snowden get wrong? everything. andrew lightman in the "l.a. times." we posted this up at stephanie miller facebook. snowden is out of his limbo. i hope the food is lousy, the winter is cold and the internet access is awful. >> it is russia. you're pretty much guaranteed all three of those. >> stephanie: i worry more about the damage snowden has done and could still do to strike the right balance between privacy and security. i do, too. he says those following snowden should understand two key points. first, though many things need to be kept secret in today's dangerous world, the line between secret and not secret is stark. the harsh t
, is the drug cartels and the violent side of is a demand for drugs in the united states of america. whether they have a submarine, like i have seen in colombia. it is a violent place when you have armed members bringing drugs across the border into our country. i do not excuse any action that .ook place but to somehow think it is not dangerous when cartel members are bringing drugs up to this country is not an adequate reading of the situation on the border, and i visit it all the time. said, i think the answer to our border control is technology. you have a point about additional border patrol. one of the things we need more of is customs people so we can .xpedite traffic back and forth there are some of us here old enough to remember we used to be able to walk across and have and walkedgales back. think about doing that today. you bring up problems on the border, and with this surveillance capability, we will people back,keep and then we will be able to send these teams out. finally, the coyotes. we know these coyotes are the worst scum of the earth people, and they are bringing people it
wrote about in the "the washington post" this week. america's chronic overreaction to terrorism, we have created an economy of fear, an industry of fear, a national psychology of fear. al qaeda could have never achieved that on its own. we have inflicted it on ourselves. >> fundamentally, there are two sets of questions that apply in the war against terrorism. the one set of questions deals with the where's it going to happen, what's going to happen, and when is it going to happen. the other set of questions deals with what is it that our enemy, the terrorists, are trying to achieve? what are they trying to induce us to do? take a look at what's been happening over the past week. with a conference call, al qaeda has effectively shut down 20 u.s. embassies around north africa and the middle east. we just had the president of yemen here for a meeting with president obama. he goes back feeling wonderful about his new relationship with the president. next thing the president does is says in effect, sorry, but we don't trust you yemenis to protect your embassies so in effect we shut down our
exactly who he is talking about. in the meantime one of the most outspoken businessmen into america might try to pay his way into the white house, so he says. donald trump is willing to shell out big bucks for presidential bid in 2016. he had a short run campaign in the republican primaries but dropped out to back former governor mitt romney. "the donald" explaining just how far he is willing to dig into his wallet. >> if you were to run for president, how much would you be will to spend on your campaign? >> if i made a decision i would spend a lot. >> a modern presidential campaign can be half a billion dollars. >> can be or more. no, i would be willing to spend, if i did it i would spend whatever it took. jenna: if, if he did it. claiming a fortune more than $10 billion, trump said voters would see a man who built a company with tremendous net worth. he hasn't been totally forthcoming about how much money is actually in his companies which has been controversial over the last self years but that's what he says his company is worth. we'll take him at his word. >> he has been accused in t
that brought sweeping republican gains two years later. america seems to be left with the status quo. the gop kept control of the house. the division between the parties is as sharp as ever. that doesn't mean it wasn't worth the ride. we are treated to spicy anecdote like the empty chair in tampa. balls says top romney advisers were sickened. he walked out of the room and threw up. there was insight into the mind set of an obama team ready to engage in hostilities. case and point, jim messina said my favorite philosopher is mike tyson. he said everyone has a plan until you punch them in the face. my job is to punch them in the face. it was fought out in small ways. if 2008 was inspiring, 2012 was negative and nasty. joining us is dan balls, author of "collision 2012." dan, thanks so much for joining the program and congrats on the book. >> thank you. glad to be here. >> we are happy to have you. the future of elections in america, after 2012, given the prolonged and insane nature, what do you think each party learned and how do you think it's going to affect 2016? >> you speak of long campaig
and in latin america. sometimes from countries that didn't exist in the world of empire, in the colonial world of 1913, 100 years ago, and 1914 at the start of the first world war. diplomats today represent governments, as they always have, but they also represent international institutions like the united nations. you fly the flag of the united nations here at chautauqua. they represent international institutions like the world bank and the international monetary fund. and i even think people who work for nonprofit organizations, who are dedicated to combating poverty, who want to promote economic development, who are promoting health care, who are trying to promote peace, i think they're diplomats too,. so in that vein think of bill and melinda gates and the enormously positive impact those two people and their foundation are ching on the fight against live aids, the fight to eradicate polio, which is nearly complete. only three countries in the world where polio exists these days. think of the champion figure skater michelle kwan. you saw her in the olympics. she's joined the state departme
. says america who isn't free and runs off to china and russia to tell about it is not exactly my idea of a great american patriot. i do put a lot of trust in the people who had defended the united states of america their entire careers with distinction and with honor and with the .alor when they walk in and tell me, this is what it is and we are not doing this and you're not doing that and we're not doing this and we asked them the question, then i have got to listen to that before i jerked the rug out from under them. congress is looking at this. it will continue. you, i always worry about the concentrations of power and and eventual liberty. i think that is what keeps free, that individual citizens are passionate about you havethe same time, these abuses. you have got to know where they and i do not think we have lost these freedoms. had, we would not be having this conversation on c- span. it is not china. there is the fbi case and they lost that case -- >> [indiscernible] >> we will see what happens. >> [indiscernible] the consent of the court -- [applause] in the presidential ele
of america. i have profound concerns about the reins act. what will it be on air and water quality. this bill would undermine the ability of agencies to protect the public interest. it is continuation of the majority anti--middle class, big business regulatory approach to governing. they rely on debunk bipartisan studies. they presuppose that regulations have harmful effects on job growth. far from it. there is bipartisan evidence in support of the opposite conclusion. regulations ensure that the air and water we consume. the air that we breathe. the places where we work and where our kids go to school are safe. regulations ensure fairness in the workplace and in the marketplace. regulations are necessary to s, tect tv nots from the have whereas the reins act protects the have nots from the haves. this is an out of control freight train to drive its reckless regulatory agenda through congress. this threatens us to send us back in time to the early 1900's, where there was no workplace protections and no limits on wall street. if republican leadership truly believed in creating jobs, we would h
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last day on current tv. al jazeera america starts i guess on tuesday, but i'm not sure. >> al jazeera has a big house. >> stephanie: indeed. we will have a new television show -- we're on vacation the first week in september, but as soon as we know we'll tweet you out. and you can get the steph cast. [ bell chimes ] >> absolutely. go to stephaniemiller.com to find out how. >> stephanie: yes. in the meantime, guess who is here, our thursday buddy, our pal. ♪ karl >> stephanie: karl frisch, bullfightstrategies.com. ♪ frisch >> stephanie: good morning. >> good morning. i think i get to break the news, hence forth after your vacation, the show will be aired from jim's colonoscopy. >> stephanie: yes, and the rumor is that we're going to dog tv, but that rumor is incorrect. >> no, it is animal planet 6. >> stephanie: right. >> and they will just be sitting? our stead, feed them peanut butter, watch their mouths move. >> stephanie: karl frisch, we have to take a peak into right wing world, you know the rodeo clown incident -- >> yes. >> stephanie: it turned into a giant klan rally -- >>
in a row is pretty suspicious and bank of america says they'll try to -- >> common practice, it happens constantly with young kids in that -- >> sad story. >> drinking red bull and coffee. >> yeah. >> that's just the culture? >> absolutely. >> but let's not in any way start to assign a bank or anybody else -- >> no, no, not a bank, just the culture of investment banking. >> and it's the culture of the competitive nature for college kids now trying to get jobs. it is, you bust a gut to try to get these, even unpaid internships, maybe not pulling three all-nighters. >>> the "new york daily news." dr. oz came to the rescue of a 23-year-old british tourist. the tourist was sitting near a fountain outside of this building, rockefeller center, when a taxi cab jumped the curb, trying to run down a bicyclist in what witnesses say was a foot of road rage. dr. oz heard the crash and went to the scene to assist the victim along with other first responders. reports say she lost part of one leg. apparently there was a plumber there, he used his belt as a tourniquet and that helped save her life. >>
of the united states of america. >> the conservative family leadership summit ended yesterday in iowa after party leaders all took the stage. donald trump, who was once again considering his own presidential bid, was also there in iowa. this is what he said about the 2012 election. >> i like mitt romney personally. i think he's a very good guy. i don't know what the hell happened with his campaign. i just don't get it. that was an election that couldn't have been lost. it couldn't have been lost. >> donald trump in iowa. let's get right to the brain trust. goldie taylor, and the managing editor of the goldie taylor project. and also an msnbc contributor and political editor for the grio. and the daily caller writes for u.s. news and world report. good to have all of you with us on a sunday afternoon. goldie, the fallout from the nsa leaks by edward snowden, cancellation of talks with russia's president vladimir putin. it has put u.s. relations with russia under a microscope. senator john mccain said this morning that be russia has no interest in maintaining a good relationship with the unit
because a few months ago when you were asked what's the biggest geopolitical threat facing america, you said russia. not al qaeda. in the 1980s are now calling to ask for their foreign policy back because the cold war has been over for 20 years. >> white house -- >> boy, that's a cute line. it's just so dead wrong. it's not even funny. and every single country that's causing problems right now, whether it's iran, whether it's syria, of course we've got the snowden issue now, it is russia at the center of it and russia has now made fools of two presidents, nicole, yours and barack obama. >> right. i mean, look, he's a shirtless thug and he's someone who really has made a fool of this president, who i think earnestly intended to re-set relations but naively thought that was possible. >> can i say, donny twitched when -- >> shirtless? >> look -- >> when the phrase shirtless thug, because -- no, no, willie. >> he did. >> when you said shirtless thug, it was as if donny was walking down like the streets, the mean streets of southampton. >> shirtless. >> that shirtless thug, he said he was go
forcing -- there is an organizing i'm advising calling the compact for america trying to get a balanced budget amendment and get a convention call a nifty idea to control a run away convention. there are policy innovations that states are trying to put together, again, across a host of areas left, right, which is trying to reassert the original dynamic. not nullify. states cannot say federal law is no good. just to rebalance the power in the country. host: ian, can you speak to federal effort pushing back? if that's the way right to look at this. what is or what can the federal government do once states put these efforts into place? guest: if we are talking about an actual nullification law, that's when the state tries to forbid the federal government from forcing its own law, those laws are void almost automatically. guest: john c. calhoun is probably roaming the studios right now. guest: the federal official would try to enforce the law, presumably the state would try to stop them. and then it would be very easy for the federal government to get a court order to say that the state can
america. gas prices are falling. the national average for a gallon dropped to $3.56, down about a nickel from last week. and there may be more relief by autumn. prices falling to $3.40. gas prices are going down. how do you feel about that? >> that's a good thing. it's great. tired of paying high prices. >> i think it would be amazing. if it goes down, it would be great. yeah, a great thing for me. i think i'll come into the city more off with my car. >> reporter: the reason for the dip? aaa says crude oil prices are lower, providing downyard pressure on prices. and the agency says, if there are no major hurricanes the rest of this season to threaten refinery production, prices are expected to stay the same about fall even more. and the good news just keeps on pouring in. after three years of rising prices, the gas average for 2014 is expected to be $3.37, that's the lowest national average since 2010. david? >> welcome news. thank you. >>> and it was last night here we reported on that group gathering in iowa, calling their gathering madam president. little question who was on their min
for drivers across america. gas prices are falling. the national average for a gallon dropped to $3.56, down about a nickel from last week. and there may be more relief by autumn. prices falling to $3.40. gas prices are going down. how do you feel about that? >> that's a good thing. it's great. tired of paying high prices. >> i think it would be amazing. if it goes down, it would be great. yeah, a great thing for me. i think i'll come into the city more off with my car. >> reporter: the reason for the dip? aaa says crude oil prices are lower, providing downyard pressure on prices. and the agency says, if there are no major hurricanes the rest of this season to threaten refinery production, prices are expected to stay the same about fall even more. and the good news just keeps on pouring in. after three years of rising prices, the gas average for 2014 is expected to be $3.37, that's the lowest national average since 2010. david? >> welcome news. thank you. >>> and it was last night here we reported on that group gathering in iowa, calling their gathering madam president. little question who w
the way to have action. he didn't need to undermine america's national security to pursue whatever his conscious led him to do. there's a process by which he could have pursued his interest in a way that doesn't undermine the national security of the united states. when we have our sources and methods known by our enemies, we undermine the national security of the united states. i would say it's easy since we have not, thank god, had an attack on american soil since september 11th, to minimize the threat, but it's real. and the terrorists only have to get lucky once. we have to do it right 100% of the time. that's a tough standard. >> and a key member of your committee from california who's chair of the subcommittee dealing with russia seems to have sympathy with edward snowden. this is him yesterday on c-span. >> i thought he was being loyal to the rest of us by letting the american people know that the government was getting out of hand. accepting him for asylum, i think, was not as hostile an act as its being portrayed. >> do you agree with those views on edward snowden and russia?
cities in america. you may think you live there already. we'll tell you the truth from a new survey. >>> hello, everyone. it's high noon here in the east and 9:00 a.m. out west. welcome to "weekends with alex witt." the manhunt is over but a big mystery remains which led police from southern california to the wilderness of idaho. the abductor, james dimaggio, is dead and hannah anderson is alive and well. joe, what do you know? anything new that you're learning? >> reporter: alex, this morning we did get some new information about how they were able to locate dimaggio and hannah anderson. teams were up in helicopters searching the wilderness for any sign of them. near a campsite near morehead lake, they spotted james dimaggio and hannah anderson. they ended up landing and fbi apths hiked 2 1/2 hours before they were able to get to that campsite before there was a confrontation with dimaggio. all we know is that in the end an fbi agent shot and killed dimaggio. we're told a special fbi team is coming out to idaho to conduct an investigation on that shooting. they will be interviewing
directors in america. maybe give t.j. to somebody else. have a great weekend. stick around. you never know what this next guy is going to say. he is crazy. stick around for "the daily rundown" with chuck todd. thanks for watching us. >>> departure lines ahead of a working vacation, amid a growing pile of international issues and domestic drama over health care and the budget. president obama gets set to talk to the press later today. we'll look at the big picture. with the cabinet secretary, u.n. ambassador and just foreign policy veteran bill richardson. just four days remain till new jersey democrats decide whether corey booker does head to the united states senate or not. >>> and then a deep dive into the sky with air force one. we're going behind the scenes to the famous presidential plane. and finding out why the first plane to get that call sign is rusting away in an arizona desert. >> good morning from des moines, iowa. i'm luke casey, host of "good night iowa." it's friday, august 9th, 2013, the first day of the iowa state fair and the unofficial kickoff of the 2016 iowa caucuses.
race in america's history and that is about getting everyone excited now about what i hope will be that moment in 2017 when we all get to say madame president to hillary clinton. >> emily's list, a democratic political action committee supporting women in politics is hosting the madame president town hall and joining me now from des moines is casey hunt. thank you for being with us. clearly hillary clears the field among those who want a democratic woman in the white house. it's interesting. she referred to bill clinton as a great leader but said i don't want my daughter near him. she later apologized but one of the earliest obama supporters in the obama/clinton rivalry. she's now clearly one of the leading democratic senators, leaders nationally spearheading this today. >> absolutely. she was sort of the face, the draw for this emily's list event in des moines. who knew we would be in des moines at this point in 2013. here it is starting again. i spoke to mccaskill after the event and we talked about president obama and the fact that she had endorsed him in 2008 because th
are putting a lot of mean into public education. in america we spend more money per child than any other industrialized country in the world and, yet, the results just really haven't increased. one of the things that we have to think about is fiscal transparency. we have to know as taxpayers exactly where our dollars are going, how they are being spent and what the return on investment is. >> is there sort of one size fits all or one size fits most about the ways money is not being spent well? i mean, i know you and the unions have not seen eye-to-eye. they are not your biggest fans and there's a lot of back and forth that has been going on. i know you've invited them to come to these town halls. >> yes. >> but is it about paying teachers more? is it about getting more technology into the classroom? what do we do about this? >> that is the entire thing that we have got to discuss is, you know, if we are going to put more investment into public education, then we have to make sure that that -- those additional dollars are producing results for kids. so, for example, when it comes to teach
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 71 (some duplicates have been removed)

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